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Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Hail Columbia - First American NAtional Anthem (Karaoke and Music Notation)

Hail Columbia
Lyrics

Hail Columbia! happy land!
Hail, ye heroes! heaven-born band!
Who fought and bled in Freedom’s cause,
Who fought and bled in Freedom’s cause,
And when the storm of war was gone
Enjoyed the peace your valor won.
Let Independence be our boast,
Ever mindful what it cost;
Ever grateful for the prize,
Let its altar reach the skies.
Firm united let us be,
Rallying round our liberty;
As a band of brothers joined,
Peace and safety we shall find.

Immortal patriots, rise once more,
Defend your rights, defend your shore,
Let no rude foe, with impious hand,
Let no rude foe, with impious hand,
Invade the shrine where sacred lies,
Of toil and blood the well-earned prize.
While offering peace sincere and just,
In heaven we place a manly trust,
That truth and justice will prevail,
And every scheme of bondage fail.
Firm united let us be, etc.

Sound, sound the trump of fame!
Sound Washington’s great name,
Ring through the world with loud applause,
Ring through the world with loud applause;
Let every clime to Freedom dear
Listen with a joyful ear;
With equal skill and godlike power,
He governed in the fearful hour
Of horrid war! or guides with ease
The happier times of honest peace,
Firm united let us be, etc.

Hail Columbia - First American National Anthem (Karaoke and Music Notation)


Hail Columbia (Free MIDI Download)

Marching Through Georgia - American Civil War Song (Sheet music, MIDI and lyrics)

Marching Through Georgia
Lyrics

Bring the good old bugle, boys, we’ll sing another song,
Sing it with the spirit that will start the world along,—
Sing it as we used to sing it, fifty thousand strong,
While we were marching through Georgia.

Chorus:

“Hurrah! hurrah! we bring the Jubilee!
Hurrah! hurrah! the flag that makes you free!”
So we sang the chorus from Atlanta to the sea
While we were marching through Georgia.
How the darkies shouted when they heard the joyful sound!
How the turkeys gobbled which our commissary found!
How the sweet potatoes even started from the ground,
While we were marching through Georgia!

Chorus.

Yes, and there were Union men who wept with joyful tears
When they saw the honored flag they had not seen for years;
Hardly could they be restrained from breaking forth in cheers
While we were marching through Georgia.

Chorus.

“Sherman’s dashing Yankee boys will never reach the coast!”
So the saucy rebel said, and ’twas a handsome boast;
Had they not forgotten, alas! to reckon with the host,
While we were marching through Georgia.

Chorus:

So we made a thoroughfare for Freedom and her train,
Sixty miles in latitude,—three hundred to the main,
Treason fled before us, for resistance was in vain,
While we were marching through Georgia.

Chorus:



Marching Through Georgia - American Civil War Song (Free Sheet music Download)
Marching Through Georgia - American Civil War Song (MIDI Download)

Sherman's March to the Sea - American Good Old Song ( MIDI, lyrics)

Sherman's March to the Sea
American Good Old Song
Lyrics

Our camp fires shone bright on the mountain
That frowned on the river below,
While we stood by our guns in the morning,
And eagerly watched for the foe,
When a rider came out from the darkness
That hung over mountains and tree,
And shouted, “Boys, up and be ready,
For Sherman will march to the sea.”

When cheer upon cheer for bold Sherman
Went up from each valley and glen,
And the bugle re-echoed the music
That came from the lips of the men,
For we knew that the stars on our banner
More bright in their splendor would be,
And that blessings from Northland would greet us
As Sherman marched down to the sea.

Then forward, boys, forward, to battle,
We marched on our wearysome way,
And we strewed the wild hills of Resaca—
God bless those who fell on that day.
Then Kennesaw, dark in its glory,
Frowned down on the flag of the free;
But the East and the West bore our standard
As Sherman marched down to the sea.

Still onward we pressed till our banner
Swept out from Atlanta’s grim walls,
And the blood of the patriot dampened
The soil where traitor’s flag falls.
But we paused not to weep for the fallen
Who slept by each river and tree;
Yet we twined them wreaths of the laurel
As Sherman marched down to the sea.

Proud, proud was our army that morning
That stood by the cypress and pine
When Sherman said, “Boys, you are weary;
This day fair Savannah is thine,”
Then sang we a song for our chieftain
That echoed o’er river and lea,
And the stars on our banner shone brighter
When Sherman marched on to the sea.

Sherman's March to the Sea - American Good Old Song Free MIDI Download
Sherman's March to the Sea Free Sheet Music Download

Watch the video and learn how to play this song.

Tuesday, June 28, 2011

WOW (War on Waste) - Filipino Folk Song (Karaoke)

WOW (War on Waste)
Filipino Folk Song
Lyrics

WOW, War on waste
WOW, War on waste
We declare war on waste

WOW, War on waste
WOW, War on waste
We declare war on waste
repeat all

WOW (War on Waste) Video Karaoke


Sunday, June 26, 2011

The Star Spangled Banner - American National Anthem ( Original Music Score)

The Star Spangled Banner  - American National Anthem
Scanned from the book Folk Songs of Many Nations by Louis C. Elson
Words by Francis Scott Key, 1814
Download the sheet music

The Influence of Folk Song Upon Classical Music

The Influence of Folk-Song Upon Classical Music
By LOUIS C. ELSON

ROBERT FRANZ, one of the greatest song composers of modern times, once wrote to the author of this essay, “I believe that our Art began with the Lyric forms, and that it will end with them.” In. these days, when some of the musical composers are wandering far from all set forms, it is of especial interest to trace historically the truth of the first part of the above sentence, and to wonder whether the latter part will also come true. In examining the music of the past, we shall find the folk-song exerting an enormous influence in almost every epoch and in almost every direction.

The folk-song is the wild briar-rose of music; springing up by the wayside of art, it comes into being without any care being lavished upon it, without the artificial aids of the science of music; it represents the natural side of an art that has gradually become scientific. The ploughman at his labor, the soldier on his march, may have been moved to express some topic that was close to the hearts of himself and his companions in poetry and song; the favorite theme speeds from mouth to mouth, perhaps somewhat amorphous at first, but gradually reaching its most fitting shape by a process of evolution; sometimes even assuming more than one shape, as for example, the Russian song, “Troika,” which is sung differently in St. Petersburg and in Moscow, although there is quite enough of resemblance between the two versions to prove a single parentage.

With a popular origin, such as is indicated above, it is but natural to find history and folk-lore intertwining in this school of composition, or rather improvisation. The early ballads of England were but simple folk songs, yet William of Malmesbury, Roger de Hoveden, and a host of old chroniclers built many a chapter upon the information derived from them; nor did all follow the example of the first named writer, and inform their readers when they were stating ascertained facts and when detailing folk song traditions. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle contains two complete old ballads and parts of about a dozen others. Even in this remote epoch, we find the folk song growing from the ranks of the common people into a higher plane and being altered and adapted to more classic uses, and we also find men of culture trying to achieve the difficult simplicity of the songs of the people.

The folk songs of ancient Palestine were chiefly of the kinds — the joyous bridal song, the cheerful harvest or vintage song, and the wailing funeral song — and one may find many examples of each of these in the Scriptures. As they were not written out, there being no definite notation among the ancient Hebrews, we can not hope ever to discover the actual tunes that were sung. It is, however, not impossible that the melodies have filtered down through the ages; certain it is that the three schools of singing as described above, exist to-day in Arabia and Syria. Entire villages sometimes unite in a seven-day festival of rejoicing similar to the one described in the fourteenth chapter of Judges—the wedding of Samson. The Song of Solomon presents an entire book of bridal songs in the popular vein. The lamentation of David over the death of Saul and Jonathan, in the second book of Samuel i: 17—27, is an example of the mourning song.

In Amos; Habakkuk, and other books of the Old Testament, one finds further indication of the employment of folk-song, but the most artistic use of such songs is indicated in Isaiah v: i, where the prophet begins the cheerful vintage song, and then suddenly changes into the song of lamentation, the funeral lay, a contrast that must have been highly effective.

Much of dramatic action must have been united with the vocal work in the folk-songs as used by the Hebrews; in fact, when the word "dancing” occurs in the Scriptures it generally means only gesture and pantomime. If, in the light of this statement we read the song of Moses, in Exodus xv, we can imagine Miriam using a folk song which the Iraelitas. had become familiar with, can fancy her improvising the words, can see the successive gestures of pride, contempt, sarcasm and triumph, and can hear the multitude joining in the chorus at every opportunity.

This combination of action and singing becomes still more evident in the song of Deborah and Barak,in Judges v: Herder ventures a conjecture as to the style of the performance of this musical scene; he suggests that “probably verses i—ii were interrupted by the shouts of the populace; verses 12—17 were a picture of the battle with a naming of the leaders with praise or blame, and mimicking each one as named; verses 28—30 were mockery of the triumph of Sisera, and the last verse was given as a chorus by the whole people.” That the tune must have been a familiar one there can be no manner of doubt, and the whole scene, with its extemporization, its clapping of hands to mark the rhythm, its alternation of solo and chorus, would not be very unlike the singing at some of the negro camp-meetings on the southern plantations.

Against these military folk-songs after victory, we can place the minstrel songs of early medieval times be/ore the battle. It was the custom of the minstrel of the Middle Ages to march at the head of a cohort of soldiers, singing ballads of heroism to encourage the men-at-arm, and as he sang he tossed his spear high up in the air, or twirled his sword dexterously. Out of this old custom grew the drum major of modern times, who marches at the head of a procession, twirling his long silver-knobbed baton, and having no apparent connection with the band or the parade which he precedes.

The longevity of some folk-songs and their strange metamorphoses can scarcely be exaggerated. The well-known bacchanalian melody sung in England to the words of “He’s a Jolly Good Fellow,” and in America to “We Won’t Go Home Till Morning,” has the most variegated history of them all. Beginning in the Holy Land as a song in praise of a French crusader who lost his life near Jerusalem, the “Chanson de Mambron” took such strong root in the Orient that the melody is sung today in some parts of Egypt and Arabia, where they mistakenly claim it to be an old Egyptian folk-tune. The “Mambron,” altered by a French queen into “Malbrooke,” gave rise to “Malbrooke s’en va-t-en Guerre,” which, folk-song was used by no less a composer than Beethoven, in an orchestral work—”The Battle of Vittoria.” Crossing the channel, and afterwards the ocean, the song of the old crusader became the carol of the modern rollicker.

At about the time of the first crusade the folk-song was being used in a manner which was of the utmost importance in the evolution of the scientific side of music; it became the core around which the earliest composers wove their counterpoint; already in the twelfth century it was customary for the musician to choose some melody familiar to the people, and to combine it with another melody of his own creation. The support of melody by melody (instead of by chords) constitutes counterpoint, and it is not too much to say that the earliest skillful music of this kind sprang directly from the folk-song.

The composers at this time (always excepting the Troubadours and Minnesingers) were almost all in the direct service of the church. In the wedding of melodies as above described (too often, at first, a “mesalliance”) they sought to accentuate their skill by using sacred words only in the parts that they added as counterpoint, preserving the original words in the folk-song that they had chosen to embellish. Thus it was not impossible to hear in the church service the tenor trolling out a love song while the other voices sang “Kyrie Eleison” or other sacred texts. In a little while certain songs became especial favorites for contrapuntal setting, and occasionally different composers would enter into direct competition by choosing the same melody as the core of their masses, each one trying to excel the other in the ingenuity of his added parts, or counterpoint.

There was one canto fermo, as the chief melody of counterpoint is called, that was an especial favorite with the great composers during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. This was the old folk-song entitled” L’Homme Arm.” A host of composers, extending from the time of Dufay to the epoch of Carissimi, and including Palestrina, Des Pres (who wrote two masses on the theme), Busriois, Tinctor, and many others, composed masses of which the simple folk-song was the core, The original of the old "chanson" can not now be determined. Some imagine it to be an old Provençal folk-song, others believe that it was the original melody of the "Song of Roland" quoted above.

Some two hundred masses are said to have been composed with this old folk-song for their central theme. It must be remembered, however, that in this early musical epoch the melody was not of such supreme importance as at present, for it was given, not to the highest voice, then called discant, but to the tenor. We find an indication of this in the names given to the parts themselves. Bass (ôasis), meant the fundamental part, the foundation; Alto (altisonus), the high-sounding part, for it was then sung by men, and was, of course, in the highest register; Discant (dis cantus), a part derived from the melody Tenor (teneo), the part that held the melody.

In an old part-song book the present writer once found the following verses defining the duty of the voices in the contrapuntal quartets of the sixteenth century: he has translated them from the German-

Ye little youths and maidens neat,
We want your voices high and sweet.
Your study to the discant bring,
The only part that you should sing.

The alto suits to nice young men
Who can sing up and down again.
This surely is the alto’s way,
So study at it night and day.


The tenor has the following verse:

In middle paths are all my arts.
The holder of the other parts.
They lean on me through all the song,
Else all the music would go wrong.

Finally the bass states:

My station is a lower lot.
He who to middle age hath got,
And growleth like a bear so hoarse,
Why let him sing the bass, of course.

Throughout the time of the Reformation this was the regular distribution of parts in choral singing; of the use of the folk-song at that time we have already spoken in these pages, and we need only reiterate that there was no epoch when it had greater power or exerted more influence upon the highest religious forms of music.

But even after the melody had been placed in the upper voice we still find many a folk-song in the chorals. The change of distribution of parts and the giving of the tune to the highest voice, which now changed its name from discant into soprano (from sopra—above) was made in 1586 by Lucas Osiander, who says, in introducing his new system:

“I know well that hitherto composers have led the chorale In the tenor. If one does this, however, then the melody is not well recognized among the voices. Therefore I have given the melody to the discant, that it shall be easily known, and that every layman may sing along.” Hassler gave his adhesion to the new system and other composers were not slow to follow.

The German composers followed the lead of Luther In the employment of the folk-song in the highest branches of composition. Bach, for example, in his “St. Matthew Passion Music,” made repeated use of the melody of a popular love song by Hassler. Its original title was “Mein G’mCith ist mer verwirret” (“MySpirit is Distracted”), but no one feels any sense of unfitness or irreverence, when, after being enriched with noble counterpoint, it becomes “Oh, Sacred Head Now Wounded.”

Beethoven did not enter so deeply into the spirit of the folk-song as other German composers; possibly his deafness prevented his intimate acquaintance with much of the unwritten song of Austria; yet, in his “Seventh Symphony,” in the trio of the scherzo, we find an old folk-theme used and we shall see, a little later, that even foreign folk-songs were studied by him.

The actual creation of a folk-song can rarely be ascribed to a composer; there is a difficult simplicity in such a work that is often beyond the skill of the classicist. It is, therefore, exceptional when we find Weber, Mozart, and Mendelssohn producing songs which must be classed among the folk-music of Germany. In the case of Weber, it was the fervor of a great poet, a veritable Tyrtus, that lit the flame. It was the young Koerner, who died on the battlefield at twenty-two, who in the shadow of a premonition of his early death wrote the poem called the “Sword Song,” picturing the wedding of the warner and his weapon. On this theme Weber produced one of the most fiery folk-songs in existence. Mozart achieved the simple directness of the people’s music in some parts of his “Magic Flute,” and Mendelssohn caught up the spirit of the folk-song not only of Germany but of Scotland.

Germany’s folk-music extends in many directions: it is sentimental, as in “The Lorlei,” it is military, as in the “Sword Song,” it is bacchanalian, as in “Wohlauf noch getrunken,” but probably its wildest expression Is reached in the student songs, which have been the delight of the universities for years and even centuries. Even these have not been denied entrance into the classical field, for Brahms has built his “Academic Overture” upon three of them, “Wir hatten gebauet ein stattliches Haus,” “Der Landesvater,” and “Was kommt dort von der Hoh,” the latter one of the most jovial songs of the entire repertory.

It would be unjust to leave the topic of German folk-song without paying tribute to Friedrich Silcher (who died as recently as 1860), a man who brought forth more successful folk-songs than any other recognized composer.

Scotland has ever been the leader In characteristic folk-music; the national character of Scottish music Is so pronounced, yet so versatile, that it has exerted a greater influence upon composers than the popular music of any country. There are many reason for this. It is very ancient and takes us back, in some of its numbers, to the most primitive scale forms; if ever we, are to comprehend how the old Greek music could charm. so powerfully even without the aid of harmony, it will be by a study of the old Scottish music, which may come nearer to the old Hellenic style than is suspected. The Scottish folk-song is more closely interwoven with national history than that of any other nation. It has the aid of a remarkably tender and expressive poetry. It is a music that sounds every note in the gamut of human emotion from deepest gloom to wildest merriment, from mournful dirge to rollicking Strathspey. It is not wonderful therefore that the composers of many different nationalities have come under its spell, that the folk-music of Scotland has exerted the greatest influence upon the classical school.

At the head of the list we find Beethoven gladly undertaking the arrangement of a whole series of folk-songs for a Scottish publisher —Thompson of Edinburg. Beethoven, we may add, also used a Russian folk-song in one of his string quartets. We find Schumann and Robert Franz endeavoring, though vainly, to achieve the Scottish lilt in themes taken from Burns and others, and made into German “Lieder.” We find the Swiss composer, Niedermayer, and the Frenchman, Boieldieu, using Scottish themes in their operas. We find the German, Volkmann, making both a national and a chronological error by introducing the melody of “The Campbells are Comin” in his overture, “Richard III,” in the final battle scene—a Scot’s tune composed in 1568, in an English battle fought in 1485. The modern German composer, Max Bruch, has come most thoroughly under the Scottish influence.

It must be confessed, however, that not one of the above cited instances of attempts of foreign composers to employ the Scottish song has proved thoroughly Gaelic in spirit. To one German composer only was it given successfully to imitate the Scottish muse; Mendelssohn in his “Scotch Symphony,” especially in the lilting scherzo, has actually created a Scottish theme, and we fancy that many a Scotsman would accept the tender duet, “Oh, Wert Thou in the Cauld Blast,” as a true example of his own native music.

The Irish and Welsh folk-songs have not yet come Into their just inheritance in classical music although Dr. Villiers Stanford has used some Celtic themes (notably “The Red Fox”) in his “Irish Symphony,” and F. H. Cowen has made some employment of Welsh tunes in his “Welsh Symphony.” Music is often the child of sorrow, national or individual, and it is but natural to find, among the more oppressed of civilized races, a folk-music of especial emotional power. This is emphatically the case with the music of the Bohemians, Russians, Poles and Hungarians, and, when these mines are more thoroughly explored by the classical composers of the world, much virgin gold will be discovered to be worked into musical jewels by the skilled artificer. The older Bohemian music is almost obliterated, for the unhappy nation was scourged into silence by thirty years of war, and almost all of its songs succeed that dreadful epoch.

Only in recent times did the renaissance of Bohemian music take place; it was Smetana who first wrote in classical forms founded upon the folk-songs of his country. The music of this composer is intensely national, and shows what a wealth of expression lies in the melody of his native land.

Fortunately he had a pupil whom he imbued with his own love of national music, and Antonin Dvorak, although not so intense as his preceptor and friend, has carried the banner of Bohemian music over all the world.

The Hungarian music has its roots in the songs of the Gypsies. Weird and strange musicians are these wandering sons of the muse. In Buda-Pesth the present writer has often heard a band of Gypsy musicians, most of them with stringed instruments, giving fully harmonized music without a scrap of notation to guide them, improvising the orchestral settings as they played them, but always having as their theme some national melody familiar to them all and to most of their audience.

What Liszt did for Hungary, Chopin did for Poland, and the contrasted frenzy of the Slav’s gayety and gloom of despair is heard in the nocturnes, the polonaises, and the ballads of this prince of the piano. The strong contrasts of Slavonic or Czech music lend themselves admirably to the forms of the modern concert room.

It must be remembered that hand in hand with the folk-songs of a musical nation are the dances of the people. It is impossible to exaggerate the influence of these upon classical music, for not only have they entered freely into orchestral and even symphonic works, but they have, in some degree, influenced the very shape of suite and symphony, so that it is no exaggeration to say that dancing is the mother of musical form.

In modern times we find all composers keenly sensitive to the effect produced by folk-dances; Beethoven introduces the hop-waltz into his “Sixth Symphony,” Brahms enriches an entire series of Hungarian dances with noble harmonies, Liszt freely employs the czardas, a species of Hungarian jig, in some of his most effective
passages.

When the name of Russia is mentioned, the investigator of folk-song may well pause, astonished at the vast extent of the repertory spread out before him. Russia is a world in itself, and the same may be said of its folk-music. Yet the wonderful mine has scarcely been opened even by Russian composers. Glinka, who died in 1857, may be called the pioneer of Russian national music, and in his operas he freely introduced the folk-music of his country. The last half of the nineteenth century, however, saw the constant striving of a new school of composers to build up a repertory of advanced music upon the foundation of the folk-music of Russia. “Para Domoi” (“Let Us Get Home,”i.e.,let us be our natural selves) has been the watchword of the neo-Russian school of composers in freeing themselves from German musical influences, and they decline to accept Rubinstein as representative, and even denounce Tschaikowsky as to cosmopolitan, because both are tinged with the Teutonic musical culture.

The surface of Russian folk-music has scarcely been scratched as yet; the songs of the Cossacks have not been collected, the repertory of Little Russia has not been printed and classified, and the published list will probably receive accessions from many quarters for years to come. If the statement that the complex musical forms are built upon the simpler, the classical upon the popular, means anything, the future of musical Russia, with such a fund to draw upon, must be very bright, and it is not too much to predict that the Muscovite may yet wrest the sceptre of musical supremacy from the German.

In conclusion, one may ask where America stands in the field of folk-song and its development. Like Russia our country is a world in itself, but many of its sections are necessarily destitute of true folk-music because commercial prosperity by effacing original types of character and of life, by introducing a conventional mode of existence, tends to obliterate the folk-song. The banking house, the flour mill, the cloth factory, can not inspire music. Yet in our country one can find some phases of existence that have brought forth popular music. The plantation life of the South, for example, is romantic enough to give rise to expressive music, and has done so. There is a large repertory of the negro music which has not yet been collected, and is well worthy of preservation.

One may ask if this is not rather African than American musics but the response would be that the negro could not have brought forth this music save or his life upon the southern plantation; it is the product of American life and surroundings.

There exist, also, some beautiful folk-songs founded upon this phase of existence, yet composed in the North by a Pennsylvanian. America should ever be grateful to Stephen C. Foster for creating a series of folk-songs as typical, as expressive, as beautiful as any in the world. His southern descent may have caused him to vibrate in sympathy with the southern life which he has portrayed as justly as it has been done in the repertory of the plantation itself.

Few Americans have as yet used this material; no composer of eminence has hitherto employed Foster’s themes in symphony or sonata; yet Mr. G. W. Chadwick has effectively developed some distinctly American themes in two of his symphonies, being the first eminent composer to elevate our folk-song into the symphonic domain. And the Bohemian, Dvorak, knowing well how much depends on nationality of music, taught our native composers a lesson, during his short sojourn in America, by using plantation themes in both symphony and in classical chamber music.

It is possible that a newer school of folk-music may yet arise in the United States out of the free and unrestrained ranch life of the West. There is much in such an existence to inspire music, but as yet this life has not been shared by a music-producing race. It may be that in the future the descendants of the miners, the cowboys, the farmers, of this section of our country, will create a music that shall reflect the bold and untrammeled life of the West, and add it to our scant repertory. And it is not to much too hope that out of our own typical music there shall eventually grow a great symphony and a school of advanced composition that shall be known as definitely American.
(Used by permission of The International Monthly, owners of copyright)

Friday, June 24, 2011

Another Filipino Kundiman Playlist of Very Rare Vinyl Records (Videos)

Balitaw- Ang Kanyang Larawan -Tres Rosas (Very Rare 33 RPM Vinyl Copy)
Folk Song: Alak -Sylvia La Torre (Very Rare Cassette Tape Copy)
Kundiman: Mutya Niyaring Puso -Ariston Avelino (Very Rare Vinyl Copy)
Hindi Basta-Basta - Sylvia La Torre (Very Rare Cassette Tape Copy)
Kundiman: Bayan Ko -Ruben Tagalog (Very Rare 33 RPM Vinyl Record)
Kundiman Art Song: Ano Kaya ang Kapalaran? -Sylvia La Torre (1954)
Balitaw: Pista Ng Nayon -Ruben Tagalog (Very Rare 33 RPM Vinyl Record)
Balitaw: Fiesta -Sylvia La Torre (Very Rare Vinly Copy)
Kundiman: Luha sa Galak (Very Rare Vinyl Copy)
Tagalog Folk Song/Dance: ABARURAY- Mabuhay Singers (Very Rare Vinyl Copy)

Filipino Kundiman Playlist of Very Rare Vinyl Records (Videos)


Videos from philclassic

Largos Fairy Dance-Irish Folk Tune (Piano Sheet Music, MIDI and VIdeo)

Largos Fairy Dance-Irish Folk Tune (Free Piano Sheet Music Download)
Largos Fairy Dance-Irish Folk Tune (MIDI Download)

Follow the tune in the video as you play the song  "Largos Fairy Dance" in your piano or keyboard.

Alfred Pa Hultet - Folk Tune (Piano Sheet Music, MIDI and VIdeo)

Alfred Pa Hultet-Folk Tune (Free Piano Sheet Music Download)
Alfred Pa Hultet Folk Tune (MIDI Download)
Follow the tune in the video as you play "Alfred Pa Hultet Folk Tune"in piano.

The Game Cock-Irish Folk Tune (Sheet Music, MIDI and Video)

The Game Cock-Irish Folk Tune (Free Sheet Music Download)
The Game Cock-Irish Folk Tune (Free MIDI Download)

Follow the tune in the video as you play the song.

Camptown Races-Irish Folk Tune (Sheet Music, MIDI and VIdeo)

Camptown Races-Irish Folk Tune (Free Sheet Music Download)
Camptown Races-Irish Folk Tune (Free MIDI Download)

Watch the video on how to play this sheet music.

Eileen O Riordans - Irish Folk Tune (Sheet Music, MIDI and Video)

Eileen O Riordans - Irish Folk Tune (Free Sheet Music Download)
Eileen O Riordans - Irish Folk Tune (Free Sheet Music Download)

Eileen O Riordans - Irish Folk Tune (MIDI Download)
Eileen O Riordans - Irish Folk Tune (Video of Music Notation)

Thursday, June 23, 2011

Brian Boru's March - Irish Traditional Folk Tune Midi and Orchestra

Brian Boru's March - Irish Traditional Folk Tune Free Midi Download
Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

Ulster Orchestra with Sir James Galway Video

from 1994, Brian Boru's March and Londonderry Air. Conducted by Mathias Bamert
http://youtu.be/4YYyXwKWgNk

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

Planxty George Brabazon - The Irish Harp plus The Chieftains

Planxty George Brabazon - The Irish Harp Folk Tune Free MIDI Download
Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

Watch "Planxty George Brabazon" Video

Planxty George Brabazon
John McCutcheon (MP3 Download)

Bonny Portmore - Irish Traditional Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

Bonny Portmore
Irish Traditional Folk Song
Lyrics

Oh Bonny Portmore, you shine where you stand
And the more I think on you the more I think long
If I had you now as I had once before
All the Lords in Old England would not purchase Portmore.
Oh Bonny Portmore I am sorry to see
Such a woeful destruction of your ornament tree
For it stood on your shore for many's the long day
Till the long boats of Antrim came to float it away.

All the birds in the forest they bitterly weep
Saying, "Where will we shelter or where will we sleep?"
For the oak and the ash they are all cutten down
And the walls of Bonny Portmore are all down to the ground.

Oh Bonny Portmore, you shine where you stand
And the more I think on you the more I think long
If I had you now as I had once before
All the Lords in Old England would not purchase Portmore.

Bonny Portmore - Irish Traditional Folk Song Free Midi Download
Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

A Bunch of Thyme - Irish Traditional Folk Song Sheet Music, Midi and Lyrics

A Bunch of Thyme
Irish Traditional Folk Song
Lyrics

Come all you maidens young and fair
All you that are blooming in your prime
And always beware
To keep your garden fair
Let no man steal away your thyme.

For thyme it is a precious thing
And thyme brings all things to my mind
Thyme with all its labours,
Along with all its joys
Thyme brings all things to an end

Once I had a bunch of thyme
I thought it never would decay
Then came a lusty sailor,
Who chanced to pass my way
And stole my bunch of thyme away.
For thyme it is a precious thing . . . .

The sailor gave to me a rose
A rose that never would decay
He gave it to me,
To keep me reminded
Of when he stole my thyme away
For thyme it is a precious thing . . . .

A Bunch of Thyme - Irish Traditional Folk Song Sheet Music
A Bunch of Thyme - Irish Traditional Folk Song Sheet Music

A Bunch of Thyme - Irish Traditional Folk Song Free Midi Download

Daisy Bell - American Traditional Folk Song Sheet Music, Midi and Lyrics

Daisy Bell
"Bicycle Built for Two" 
American Traditional Folk Song
Lyrics

There is a flower within my heart,
Daisy, Daisy!
Planted one day by a glancing dart,
Planted by Daisy Bell!
Whether she loves me or loves me not,
Sometimes it's hard to tell;
Yet I am longing to share the lot
Of beautiful Daisy Bell!

Chorus:
Daisy Daisy,
Give me your answer do!
I'm half crazy,
All for the love of you!
It won't be a stylish marriage,
I can't afford a carriage,
But you'll look sweet on the seat
Of a bicycle built for two !

We will go "tandem" as man and wife,
Daisy, Daisy!
Ped'ling away down the road of life,
I and my Daisy Bell!
When the road's dark we can despise
P'liceman and lamps as well;
There are bright lights in the dazzling eyes
Of beautiful Daisy Bell!
Chorus:

I will stand by you in "wheel" or woe,
Daisy, Daisy!
You'll be the bell(e) which I'll ring, you know!
Sweet little Daisy Bell!
You'll take the lead in each trip we take,
Then if I don't do well;
I will permit you to use the brake,
My beautiful Daisy Bell!!!
Chorus:

Sample view of Daisy Bell Sheet music
Daisy Bell - American Traditional Folk Song Sheet Music

Daisy Bell - American Traditional Folk Song Free Midi Download
Daisy Bell - American Traditional Folk Song Free Sheet Music PDF

Monday, June 20, 2011

Drunken Sailor - American Folk Song Video and Lyrics

Drunken Sailor
Irish Rovers
American Folk Song
Lyrics

Chorus
Way, hay and up she rises,
Way, hay, and up she rises,
Way, hay, and up she rises,
Early in the morning!

Shave his belly with a rusty razor
Shave his belly with a rusty razor
Shave his belly with a rusty razor
Early in the morning!

Chorus 

What will we do with the drunken sailor?
What will we do with the drunken sailor?
What will we do with the drunken sailor?
Early in the morning.

Chorus

Put him in a long boat until he's sober.
Put him in a long boat until he's sober.
Put him in a long boat until he's sober.
Early in the morning.

Chorus

Stick him in a barrel with a hosepipe on him
Stick him in a barrel with a hosepipe on him
Stick him in a barrel with a hosepipe on him
Early in the morning.

Chorus

Put him in the bed with the Captain's daughter
Put him in the bed with the Captain's daughter
Put him in the bed with the Captain's daughter
Early in the morning.

Chorus

That's wahat we do with a drunken sailor
That's wahat we do with a drunken sailor
That's wahat we do with a drunken sailor
Early in the morning.

Chorus

Watch "Drunken Sailor" - American Folk Song (Video Karaoke)

Do Your Ears Hang Low? - American Children Folk Song Video and Lyrics

Do Your Ears Hang Low?
American Children Song
Lyrics

Do your ears hang low, do they waggle to and fro?
Can you tie them in a knot, can you tie them is a bow?
Can you toss them over your shoulder like a continental soldier?
Do your ears hang low?

Yes, my ears hang low, they can waggle to and fro?
I can tie them in a knot, I can tie them is a bow?
I can toss them over my shoulder like a continental soldier?
Yes, my ears hang low?

Additional lyrics:
Do your ears stick out, can you waggle them about?
Can you flap them up and down as you fly around the town?
Can you shut them up for sure when you hear an awful bore?
Do your ears stick out?

Do your ears stand high, do they reach up to the sky?
Do they hang down when they’re wet, do they stand up when they’re dry?
Can you semaphore your neighbor with the minimum of labor?
Do your ears stand high?

Do Your Ears Hang Low? - American Children Folk Song (Video)

Black is the color of my true love's hair - American Folk Song (Video and Lyrics)

Black is the color of my true love's hair
American Folk Song
Campfire Folk Song
Lyrics

Black is the color of my true love's hair
His face so soft and wondrous fair
The purest eyes
and the strongest hands
I love the ground on where he stands
I love the ground on where he stands

Black is the color of my true love's hair
Of my true love's hair
Of my true love's hair

Oh I love my lover
and where he goes
yes, I love the ground on where he goes
And still I hope
that the time will come
when he and I will be as one
when he and I will be as one

So black is the color of my true love's hair
Black is the color of my true love's hair
Black is the color of my true love's hair


Watch this video - Black is the color of my true love's hair by Nina Simone
http://youtu.be/p70tMgHdSP0

All the Pretty Horses (lullaby) - American Traditional Folk Song Video and Lyrics

All the Pretty Horses (lullaby)
(also known as "Hush-a-bye") - traditional African American lullaby from the southern United States.
Campfire Folk Song
Lyrics

Hush-a-bye, don't you cry,
Go to sleepy my little baby,
When you wake, you shall have
All the pretty little horses.

Dapples and greys,pintos and bays
All the pretty little horses,

Way down yonder, in the meadow
Poor little baby, crying mama

Birds and the butterflies
Fluter round his eyes
Poor little baby, crying mama

Hush-a-bye, don't you cry,
Go to sleepy my little baby.
When you wake, you shall have
All the pretty little horses.

Dapples and greys,pintos and bays
All the pretty little horses,
Hmmm............

Sing along with this video

A chipmunk, Chipmunk Sitting on a Limb - American Traditional Folk Song Lyrics

A chipmunk, Chipmunk Sitting on a Limb
American Traditional Folk Song
Campfire Folk Song
Lyrics

Oh a chipmunk, chipmunk sitting on a limb
And he winked at me and I at him
So I picked up a chip and I hit him on the chin
And he said: "Young man, don't you try that again!"
Hey skip along, skip along a Josie
Hey skip along and a skip along a Joe
Hey skip along, skip along a Josie
Hey skip along and a skip along a Joe

Saturday, June 18, 2011

The Snowy Breasted Pearl - Irish Traditional Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

The Snowy Breasted Pearl
Irish Traditional Folk Song
Lyrics

There's a colleen fair as May
For a year and for a day
I have sought by every way
Her heart to gain.
There's no art of tongue or eye
Fond youths with maidens try
But I've tried with ceaseless sigh
Yet tried in vain.
    If to France or far off Spain
    She crossed the wat'ry main
    To see her face again the seas I'd brave
    And if it's heaven's decree
    That mine she'll never be
    May the Son of Mary me in mercy save.

But a kiss with welcome bland
And the touch of thy fair hand
Are all that I demand
Would'st thou not spurn
For if not mine, dear girl
My snowy breasted pearl
May I never from the fair
With life return.

The Snowy Breasted Pearl - Irish Traditional Folk Song Free Midi Download
Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

Bridgit O'Malley - Irish Traditional Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

Bridgit O'Malley
Irish Traditional Folk Song
Lyrics

Oh Bridgit O’Malley, you left my heart shaken
With a hopeless desolation, I’d have you to know
It’s the wonders of admiration your quiet face has taken
And your beauty will haunt me wherever I go.
The white moon above the pale sands, the pale stars above the thorn tree
Are cold beside my darling, but no purer than she
I gaze upon the cold moon till the stars drown in the warm sea
And the bright eyes of my darling are never on me.

My Sunday it is weary, my Sunday it is grey now
My heart is a cold thing, my heart is a stone
All joy is dead within me, my life has gone away now
For another has taken my love for his own.

The day it is approaching when we were to be married
And it’s rather I would die than live only to grieve
Oh meet me, my Darling, e’er the sun sets o’er the barley
And I’ll meet you there on the road to Drumslieve.

Oh Bridgit O’Malley, you’ve left my heart shaken
With a hopeless desolation, I’d have you to know
It’s the wonders of admiration your quiet face has taken
And your beauty will haunt me wherever I go.

Bridgit O'Malley - Irish Traditional Folk Song Free Midi Download
Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

The Mountains Of Mourne - Irish Traditional Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

The Mountains Of MourneIrish Traditional Folk Song
Lyrics

Oh Mary this London's a wonderful sight
With people here workin' by day and by night
They don't sow potatoes, nor barley, nor wheat
But there's gangs of them diggin' for gold in the street
At least when I asked them that's what I was told
So I just took a hand at this diggin' for gold
But for all that I found there I might as well be
Where the Mountains of Mourne sweep down to the sea.
I believe that when writin' a wish you expressed
As to how the fine ladies in London were dressed
Well if you'll believe me, when asked to a ball
They don't wear no top to their dresses at all
Oh I've seen them meself and you could not in truth
Say that if they were bound for a ball or a bath
Don't be startin' them fashions, now Mary McCree
Where the Mountains of Mourne sweep down to the sea.

There's beautiful girls here, oh never you mind
With beautiful shapes nature never designed
And lovely complexions all roses and cream
But let me remark with regard to the same
That if that those roses you venture to sip
The colors might all come away on your lip
So I'll wait for the wild rose that's waitin' for me
In the place where the dark Mourne sweeps down to the sea.

The Mountains Of Mourne - Irish Traditional Folk Song Free Midi Download
Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

The Rose Of Mooncoin - Irish Traditional Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

The Rose Of Mooncoin
Irish Traditional Folk Song
Lyrics

How sweet is to roam by the sunny Shure stream
And hear the doves coo 'neath the morning sunbeam
Where the thrush and the robin their sweet notes entwine
On the banks of the Shure that flows down by Mooncoin.
Flow on, lovely river, flow gently along
By your waters so sweet sounds the lark's merry song
On your green banks I wander where first I did join
With you, lovely Molly, the rose of Mooncoin.

Oh Molly, dear Molly, it breaks my fond heart
To know that we two forever must part
I'll think of you Molly while sun and moon shine
On the banks of the Shure that flows down by Mooncoin.

Then here's to the Shure with its valley so fair
As oftimes we wandered in the cool morning air
Where the roses are blooming and lilies entwine
On the banks of the Shure that flows down by Mooncoin.

Flow on, lovely river, flow gently along
By your waters so sweet sounds the lark's merry song
On your green banks I wander where first I did join
With you, lovely Molly, the rose of Mooncoin.

The Rose Of Mooncoin - Irish Traditional Folk Song Free Midi Download
Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

The Minstrel Boy - Irish Traditional Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

The Minstrel Boy
Irish Traditional Folk Song
Lyrics

The Minstrel Boy to the war is gone
In the ranks of death you will find him
His father's sword he hath girded on
And his wild harp slung behind him
"Land of Song!" said the warrior bard
"Tho' all the world betrays thee
One sword, at least, they rights shall guard
One faithful harp shall praise thee!"
The Minstrel fell! But the foeman's chain
Could not bring that proud soul under
The harp he lov'd ne'er spoke again
For he tore its chords asunder
And said "No chains shall sully thee
Thou soul of love and brav'ry!
Thy songs were made for the pure and free,
They shall never sound in slavery!"

The Minstrel Boy - Irish Traditional Folk Song Free Midi Download
Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

The Meeting of the Waters - Irish Traditional Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

The Meeting of the Waters
Irish Traditional Folk Song
Lyrics

There is not in the wide world a valley so sweet
As that vale in whose bosom the bright waters meet
Oh! The last rays of feeling and life must depart
Ere the bloom of that valley shall fade from my heart
Ere the bloom of that valley shall fade from my heart.
Yet it was not that nature had shed o'er the scene
Her purest of crystal and brightest of green
'Twas not her soft magic of streamlet or hill
Oh, no! It was something more exquisite still
Oh, no! It was something more exquisite still.

'Twas that friends, the belov'd of my bosom were near
Who made every dear scene of enchantment more dear
And who felt how the best charms of nature improve
When we see them reflected from looks that we love
When we see them reflected from looks that we love.

Sweet vale of Avoca! How calm could I rest
In thy bosom of shade, with the friends I love best
Where the storms that we feel in this cold world should cease
And our hearts, like thy waters, be mingled in peace
And our hearts, like thy waters, be mingled in peace.

The Meeting of the Waters - Irish Traditional Folk Song Free Midi Download

Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

Kathleen Mavourneen - Irish Traditional Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

Kathleen Mavourneen
Irish Traditional Folk Song
Lyrics

Kathleen Mavourneen! the grey dawn is breaking
The horn of the hunter is heard on the hill
The lark from her light wing the bright dew is shaking
Kathleen Mavourneen! What, slumbering still!
O hast thou forgotten how soon we must sever?
O hast thou forgotten this day we must part?
It may be for years, and it may be forever
Oh, why art thou silent, thou voice of my heart?
It may be for years, and it may be forever
Then why art thou silent, Kathleen Mavourneen?

Kathleen Mavourneen! Awake from thy slumbers
The blue mountains glow in the sun's golden light
Ah! Where is the spell that once hung on my numbers?
Arise in thy beauty, thou star of my night.

Mavourneen, mavourneen, my sad tears are falling
To think that from Erin and thee I must part.
It may be for years, and it may be forever
Oh, why art thou silent, thou voice of my heart?
It may be for years, and it may be forever
Then why art thou silent, Kathleen Mavourneen?

Kathleen Mavourneen - Irish Traditional Folk Song Free Midi Download

Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

The Maid Who Sold Her Barley - Irish Traditional Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

The Maid Who Sold Her Barley
Irish Traditional Folk Song
Lyrics

It's cold and raw, the north winds blow
Black in the morning early
When all the hills were covered with snow
Oh then it was winter fairly.
As I was riding o'er the moor
I met a farmer's daughter
Her cherry cheeks and coal-black hair
They caused my heart to falter.
I bowed my bonnet very low
To let her know my meaning.
She answered with a courteous smile
Her looks they were engaging.
"Where are you bound my pretty maid
It's now in the morning early?"
The answer that she gave to me
"Kind sir, to sell my barley."

"Now twenty guineas I've in my purse
And twenty more that's yearly.
You need not go to the market town
For I'll buy all your barley.
If twenty guineas would gain the heart
Of the maid I love so dearly
All for to tarry with me one night
And go home in the morning early."

As I was riding o'er the moor
The very evening after
It was my fortune for to meet
The farmer's only daughter.
Although the weather being cold and raw
With her I thought to parlay
The answer that she gave to me
"Kind sir, I've sold my barley."

The Maid Who Sold Her Barley - Irish Traditional Folk Song Free Midi Download
Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

Will Ye Go, Lassie? - Irish Traditional Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

Will Ye Go, Lassie?
(Wild Mountain Thyme)
Irish Traditional Folk Song
Lyrics

Oh the summertime is coming
And the trees are sweetly blooming
And the wild mountain thyme
Grows around the blooming heather
Will ye go, Lassie go?
Chorus
And we'll all go together
To pluck wild mountain thyme
All around the blooming heather
Will ye go, Lassie go?

I will build my love a tower
Near yon' pure crystal fountain
And on it I will build
All the flowers of the mountain
Will ye go, Lassie go?

If my true love she were gone
I would surely find another
Where wild mountain thyme
Grows around the blooming heather
Will ye go, Lassie go?

Will Ye Go, Lassie? - Irish Traditional Folk Song Free Midi Download
Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

The Lark In The Clear Air - Irish Traditional Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

The Lark In The Clear Air
Irish Traditional Folk Song
Lyrics

Dear thoughts are in my mind
And my soul soars enchanted
As I hear the sweet lark sing
In the clear air of the day.
For a tender beaming smile
To my hope has been granted
And tomorrow she shall hear
All my fond heart would say.
I shall tell her all my love
And my soul's adoration
And I think she will hear me
And will not say me nay.
It is this that gives my soul
All its joyous elation
As I hear the sweet lark sing
In the clear air of the day.

The Lark In The Clear Air - Irish Traditional Folk Song Free Midi Download

Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

Kilgary Mountain (Whiskey In The Jar) - Irish Traditional Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

Kilgary Mountain (Whiskey In The Jar)
Irish Traditional Folk Song
Lyrics

As I was a-walkin' 'round Kilgary Mountain
I met with Captain Pepper as his money he was countin'
I rattled my pistols and I drew forth my saber
Sayin', "Stand and deliver, for I am the bold deceiver."
Chorus
Musha rig um du rum da
Whack fol the daddy o
Whack fol the daddy o
There's whiskey in the jar.

The shinin' golden coins did look so bright and jolly
I took 'em with me home and I gave 'em to my Molly
She promised and she vowed that she never would deceive me
But the devil's in the women and they never can be easy.

When I was awakened between six and seven
The guards were all around me in numbers odd and even
I flew to my pistols, but alas I was mistaken
For Molly's drawn my pistols and a prisoner I was taken.

They put me into jail without judge or writin'
For robbing Captain Pepper on Kilgary Mountain
But they didn't take my fists so I knocked the sentry down
And bid a fond farewell to the jail in Sligo town.

Now some take delight in fishin' and in bowlin'
And others take delight in carriages a-rollin'
But I take delight in the juice of the barley
And courtin' pretty girls in the morning so early.

Kilgary Mountain (Whiskey In The Jar) - Irish Traditional Folk Song Free Midi Download
Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

The Kerry Dance - Irish Traditional Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

The Kerry Dance
Irish Traditional Folk Song
Lyrics

Chorus
Oh, the days of the Kerry dancing
Oh, the ring of the piper's tune
Oh, for one of those hours of gladness
Gone, alas, like our youth, too soon!
When the boys began to gather
In the glen of a summer's night
And the Kerry piper's tuning
Made us long with wild delight!
Oh, to think of it
Oh, to dream of it
Fills my heart with tears!

Chorus

Was there ever a sweeter Colleen
In the dance than Eily More
Or a prouder lad than Thady
As he boldly took the floor.

Lads and lasses to your places
Up the middle and down again
Ah, the merry hearted laughter
Ringing through the happy glen!
Oh, to think of it
Oh, to dream of it
Fills my heart with tears!

Chorus

Time goes on, and the happy years are dead
And one by one the merry hearts are fled
Silent now is the wild and lonely glen
Where the bright glad laugh will echo ne'er again
Only dreaming of days gone by in my heart I hear.

Loving voices of old companions
Stealing out of the past once more
And the sound of the dear old music
Soft and sweet as in days of yore.

When the boys began to gather
In the glen of a summer's night
And the Kerry piper's tuning
Made us long with wild delight!
Oh, to think of it
Oh, to dream of it
Fills my heart with tears!

Chorus


The Kerry Dance - Irish Traditional Folk Song Free Midi Download
Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

Johnny I Hardly Knew Ye - Irish Traditional Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

Johnny I Hardly Knew Ye
Irish Traditional Folk Song
Lyrics

While goin' the road to sweet Athy, hurroo, hurroo
While goin' the road to sweet Athy, hurroo, hurroo
While goin' the road to sweet Athy
A stick in me hand and a drop in me eye
A doleful damsel I heard cry,
Johnny I hardly knew ye.
With your drums and guns and drums and guns, hurroo, hurroo
With your drums and guns and drums and guns, hurroo, hurroo
With your drums and guns and drums and guns
The enemy nearly slew ye
Oh my darling dear, Ye look so queer
Johnny I hardly knew ye.

Where are your eyes that were so mild, hurroo, hurroo
Where are your eyes that were so mild, hurroo, hurroo
Where are your eyes that were so mild
When my heart you so beguiled
Why did ye run from me and the child
Oh Johnny, I hardly knew ye.

Where are your legs that used to run, hurroo, hurroo
Where are your legs that used to run, hurroo, hurroo
Where are your legs that used to run
When you went for to carry a gun
Indeed your dancing days are done
Oh Johnny, I hardly knew ye.

I'm happy for to see ye home, hurroo, hurroo
I'm happy for to see ye home, hurroo, hurroo
I'm happy for to see ye home
All from the island of Sulloon
So low in flesh, so high in bone
Oh Johnny I hardly knew ye.

Ye haven't an arm, ye haven't a leg, hurroo, hurroo
Ye haven't an arm, ye haven't a leg, hurroo, hurroo
Ye haven't an arm, ye haven't a leg
Ye're an armless, boneless, chickenless egg
Ye'll have to put with a bowl out to beg
Oh Johnny I hardly knew ye.

They're rolling out the guns again, hurroo, hurroo
They're rolling out the guns again, hurroo, hurroo
They're rolling out the guns again
But they never will take our sons again
No they never will take our sons again
Johnny I'm swearing to ye.

Johnny I Hardly Knew Ye - Irish Traditional Folk Song Free Midi Download

Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

The Irish Emigrant - Irish Traditional Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

The Irish Emigrant
Irish Traditional Folk Song
Lyrics

I'm sitting on the stile, Mary, where we once sat side by side
On a bright May morning long ago, when first you were my bride
The corn was springing fresh and green, and the lark sang loud and high
And the red was on your lips, Mary, and the love light in your eyes.
Tis but a step down yonder lane, the village Church stands near
The place where we were wed, Mary, I can see the spire from here
But the graveyard lies between, Mary, and my step might break your rest
Where I laid you darling down to sleep with a baby on your breast.

I'm very lonely now, Mary, for the poor make no new friends
But oh they love the better still the few our Father sends
For you were all I had, Mary, my blessing and my pride
And I've nothing left to care for now since my poor Mary died.

Yours was the good brave heart, Mary, that still kept hoping on
When the trust in God had left my soul and my arms young strength had gone
There was comfort ever on your lip and a kind look on your brow
And I thank you Mary for the same though you cannot hear me now.

I'm bidding you a long farewell, my Mary kind and true
But I'll not forget you, darling, in the land I'm going to
They say there's bread and work for all, and the sun shines always there
But I'll ne'er forget old Ireland, were it fifty times as fair.

And often in those grand old woods I'll sit and shut my eyes
And my heart will wander back again to the place where Mary lies
And I think I'll see that little stile where we sat side by side
In the springing corn and the bright May morn' when first you were my bride.

The Irish Emigrant - Irish Traditional Folk Song Free Midi Download
Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

Down by the Glenside - Irish Traditional Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

Down by the GlensideIrish Traditional Folk Song
Lyrics

'Twas down by the glenside, I met an old woman
She was picking young nettles and she scarce saw me coming
I listened a while to the song she was humming
Glory O, Glory O, to the bold Fenian men.
'Tis fifty long years since I saw the moon beaming
On strong manly forms and their eyes with hope gleaming
I see them again, sure, in all my daydreaming
Glory O, Glory O, to the bold Fenian men.

Some died on the glenside, some died near a stranger
And wise men have told us that their cause was a failure
They fought for old Ireland and they never feared danger
Glory O, Glory O, to the bold Fenian men.

I passed on my way, God be praised that I met her
Be life long or short, sure I'll never forget her
We may have brave men, but we'll never have better
Glory O, Glory O, to the bold Fenian men.

Down by the Glenside - Irish Traditional Folk Song Free Midi Download
Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

The Foggy Dew - Irish Traditional Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

The Foggy Dew
Irish Traditional Folk Song
Lyrics

Oh, a wan cloud was drawn o'er the dim weeping dawn
As to Shannon's side I return'd at last
And the heart in my breast for the girl I lov'd best
Was beating, ah, beating, loud and fast!
While the doubts and the fears of the long aching years
Seem'd mingling their voices with the moaning flood
Till full in my path, like a wild water wrath
My true love's shadow lamenting stood.
But the sudden sun kiss'd the cold, cruel mist
Into dancing show'rs of diamond dew
And the dark flowing stream laugh'd back to his beam
And the lark soared aloft in the blue
While no phantom of night but a form of delight
Ran with arms outspread to her darling boy
And the girl I love best on my wild throbbing breast
Hid her thousand treasures with cry of joy.

And the girl I love best on my wild throbbing breast
Hid her thousand treasures with cry of joy.

The Foggy Dew - Irish Traditional Folk Song Free Midi Download
Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

Thursday, June 16, 2011

Lady Margaret - Canadian Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

Young Man From Canada
(Tune: Tramps and Hawkers)
Canadian Folk Song
Lyrics


I'm a young man from Canada some six feet in my shoes
I left my home for Cariboo on the first exciting news
In New York City I met a gent, introduced himself to me
Said I, "I come from Canada so you can't come over me."

I sailed on the crazy Champion all in the steerage too
I thought I'd got among the fiends or other horrid crew
If you had only seen them feed, it quite astonished me
And I'd been years in Canada in a lumberman's shanty.

With seventy-five upon my back I came the Douglas way
And at an easy-going pace made thirty miles a day
I landed here without a dime in 1863
But I'd been years in Canada, 'twas nothing new to me.

In best of homespun I was clad so I was warmly dressed
The wool it grew near Montreal in a place called Canada West
On Williams Creek they called me green and Johnny come lately
But, ah, I came from Canada, I ain't from the old country.

I started out my mining life by chopping cord wood
But I was born with axe in hand so I could use it good
My chum was from the state of Maine, somewhere near Tennessee
But, ah, I came from Canada and he couldn't chop with me.

In a short time I'd made a raise and bought into a claim
There they called me engineer or carman, 'tis the same
The drifters then did try it on to boss it over me
Said I, "I come from Canada and I'm on the shoulderee."

In two weeks I got a div which drove away all care
I went over to the wake-ups and had a bully square
I danced all night till broad daylight and a gal smiled sweet on me
Said I, "I come from Canada and I'm on the marry-ee."

Now all young men who are in love and sure I am there's some
Don't count your chicks before they're hatched or they may never come
O when I asked that girl to wed she only laughed at me
"You may come from Canada but you can't come over me."

Lady Margaret - Canadian Folk Song Free Midi Download
Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

Young MacDonald - Canadian Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

Young MacDonald
Canadian Folk Song
Lyrics

He is young and fair and handsome
He's my fancy late and early
There's another who doth claim him
I don't blame her, huki wari.

   Refrain
   Aye grattalion, oh grattalion
   Aye grattalion bounsa guiles
   Telim meen geneel denoosa
   Thisakerry suas learchin.

In the fields he fought the battles
Brave enacted western arms
There were thousands there to greet him
He did spot the malcha goya.

You all know this young MacDonald
He was brought up here in Glengarry
Now he's off to Colorado
With his name and his metrachee.

Young MacDonald - Canadian Folk Song Free Midi Download
Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

William Glen - Canadian Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

William Glen
Canadian Folk Song
Lyrics

There was a ship and a ship of fame
Launched off the docks, bound for the main
With a hundred and fifty brisk young men
Which were picked and chosen in every one.

We did not sail a league but two
Till all our whole ship's jolly crew
They all fell sick but sixty-three
As we went on to New Barbary.

We did not sail a league but three
Till raging grew the rolling sea
There rose a tempest in the sky
Which filled our hearts with great surprise.

One night the Captain he did dream
There came a voice which said to him
"Prepare you and your company
For tomorrow night you shall lodge with me."

This woke the Captain in a fright
It being the third watch of the night
And to his boatmen he did call
And told him his secret all.

When in England I did dwell
A comely maiden I loved so well
A squire I slew in Staffordshire
All for the sake of a lady dear.

Oh dearest Captain, if that be so
Don't let none of our ship's crew know
Keep that secret within your breast
And pray to God to give you rest.

Next morning early the storm did rise
Which gives our seamen much surprise
The sea broke over us fore and aft
Till scarce a man on deck was left.

Then our boatswain he did declare
That our captain was a murderer
It soone enraged our whole ship's crew
And overboard our captain threw.

When this was done the calm was there
Our goodly ship onward did steer
The wind abated and calmed the sea
And we got safe to New Barbary.

William Glen - Canadian Folk Song Free Midi Download
Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

Battle of the Windmill - Canadian Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

Battle of the Windmill (Tune: The Girl I Left Behind Me)
Canadian Folk Song
Lyrics

On Tuesday morning we marched out
In command of Colonel Fraser
With swords and bayonets of polished steel
As keen as any razor.
Unto the Windmill plains we went
We gave them three loud cheers
To let them know that day below
We're the Prescott Volunteers.

Oh, we're the boys that feared no noise
When the cannons loud did roar
We cut the rebels left and right
When they landed on our shore.
Brave Macdonall nobly led
His men into the field;
They did not flinch, no, not an inch
Till the rebels had to yield.

He swung his sword right round his head
Saying, "Glengarrys follow me,
We'll gain the day without delay,
And that you'll plainly see!"
The rebels now remain at home,
We wish that they would come
We'd cut them up, both day and night,
By command of Colonel Young.

If e'er they dare return again
They'd see what we can do;
We'll show them British play, my boys,
As we did at Waterloo.
Under Colonel Jessup we will fight,
Let him go where he will;
With powder and ball they'll surely fall
As they did at the Windmill.

If I were like great Virgil bright
I would employ my quill;
I would write both day and night
Concerning the Windmill.
Lest to intrude I will conclude
And finish off my song,
We'll pay a visit to Ogdensburg
And that before it's long!

Battle of the Windmill - Canadian Folk Song Free Midi Download

Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

Who is at my Window Weeping? - Canadian Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

Who is at my Window Weeping?
Canadian Folk Song
Lyrics

Who is at my window weeping,
Weeping there so bitterly?
"It's I, it's I, your own true loved one
Arise, arise and pity me."

"Darling, go and ask your mother
If thou my wedding bride will be
If she says no, return and tell me.
No longer will I trouble thee."

"How can I go and ask my mother
For I'm her only child and dear?
Oh, darling, go and seek some other,"
She softly whispered in his ear.

"Darling, go and ask your father
If thou my wedding bride will be
If he says no, return and tell me.
No longer will I trouble thee."

"My father's on his bed a-sleeping
With a shining sword placed on his breast
All for to slay my own true loved one,
To slay the lad that I love best."

Then William took the shining sword
And pierced it through his aching heart
"Adieu, adieu to all false loved ones.
Adieu, adieu, we both shall part."

Then Mary took the blood-stained sword
And pierced it through her lily white breast.
"Adieu, adieu to my cruel parents.
Adieu, adieu, we both shall rest."

Who is at my Window Weeping? - Canadian Folk Song Free Midi Download
Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

Jim Whalen - Canadian Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

Jim Whalen
Canadian Folk Song
Lyrics

Come gentlemen and ladies, I pray you to draw near
'Tis of a mournful accident that I would have you hear
'Tis of a young and noble youth, Jim Whalen he was called
Who was drowned off Pete McLaren's raft below the upper fall.

The rapids they were raging, the river it ran high
The foreman to young Whalen said, "This jam we'll have to try.
You are both young and active, of danger you've no fear.
You're just the man to help me now and get this river clear."

Young Whalen then made answer unto his comrades bold
"Come one and all together; we'll do as we are told.
We'll obey our orders bravely, as noble men should do."
But as he spoke the jam it broke and let poor Whalen through.

Three brave youths were on the jam, and two of them were saved
But noble-hearted Whalen sank far beneath the wave.
No mortal man could live upon that foaming watery main
And though he struggled hard for life, his struggles were in vain.

The foaming waters roared and tossed the logs from shore to shore
Now here, now there his body went, a-tumbling o'er and o'er.
One fearful cry for mercy, "Oh, God look down on me!"
And his soul was freed from earthly care, bound to eternity.

Come all ye jolly raftsmen, think on poor Whalen's fate.
Take warning and be careful before it is too late
For death's still lurking 'round you, still seeking to destroy
The pride of many a father's heart and many a mother's joy.

Jim Whalen - Canadian Folk Song Free Midi Download
Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

The Prince Edward Island Wedding Reel - Canadian Folk Tune Midi

The Prince Edward Island Wedding Reel
The Herring Reel
Canadian Folk Tune Free Midi Download
Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

Vive la Canadienne! - Canadian Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

Vive la Canadienne!
Canadian Folk Song
Lyrics

Vive la Canadienne
Vole, mon coeur, vole!
Vive la Canadienne
Et ses jolis yeux doux
Et ses jolis yeux doux, doux, doux
Et ses jolis yeux doux.

Nous la menons aux noces
Vole mon coeur, vole!
Nous la menons aux noces
Dans tous ses beaux atours
Dans tous ses beaux atours, 'tours, 'tours
Dans tous ses beaux atours.

On danse avec nos blondes
Vole mon coeur, vole!
On danse avec nos blondes
Nous changeons tour à tour
Nous changeons tour à tour, tour, tour
Nous changeons tour à tour.

Ainsi le temps se passe
Vole mon coeur, vole!
Ainsi le temps se passe
Il est vraiment bien doux
Il est vraiment bien doux, doux, doux
Il est vraiment bien doux.

Vive la Canadienne! - Canadian Folk Song Free Midi Download
Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

Yon Green Vallee - Canadian Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

Yon Green Vallee
Canadian Folk Song
Lyrics

When first my darling came a-courting me
I have no doubt but he did love me
I was his fair face and his flattering tongue
So entic-ed me, I was but young.

On the green bank where we sat down
The pretty little small birds came whistling round
Changing their notes so melodiously
As the sun arose o'er yon green vallee.

It was on the Bible he made me swear
Look at those few lines are written there
No other man I'll ever take
And when he's dead love none for his sake.

For a month or better my love proved kind
And after that he changed his mind
Saying, "Tis my parents I must obey,
So farewell, darling, I must away."

Now I caught his hand, would not let him go,
Saying, "James you're my lover and that you know,
Remember the vows that you made to me
As the sun arose o'er the green vallee."

I will sing one verse of his yellow hair,
His rosy cheeks are uncompared,
His dark blue eyes so entic-ed me
As the sun rose o'er the green vallee.

Oh Jimmy darling I love you well,
I love you more than tongues can tell,
I love you more than pen can write
Oh Jimmy darling you're my heart's delight.

I will sing one verse and I'll sing no more
Of the false young man I so adored,
I will change my mind like the wavering wind,
I will dote no more upon false mankind.

Yon Green Vallee - Canadian Folk Song Free Midi Download

Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

Time to be Made a Wife - Canadian Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

Time to be made a Wife
Canadian Folk Song
Lyrics

As I roved out one morning in the lovely month of May
I met a pretty fair one, these words I heard her say:
"Oh, father, I'm sixteen years of age; I'm weary of my life.
Oh, father, I think it's almost time for me to be made a wife."

"Oh, hold your tongue, dear daughter. Oh, hold your tongue," said he,
"For men they are deceitful with flatt'ring tongues," said he.
"Oh, what care I for flatt'ring tongues, for flatt'ring tongues," said she;
"At the time you married my mamma she wasn't as old as me."

"I have a sister Mary, and that you well do know.
She has not long been married, only nine short months ago.
She has a baby for herself to daddle upon her knee,
And I think it's time for me to have one, for I'm nearly as old as she."

The bell-man he went round the town to see what he could find
A soldier or a sailor to please this fair one's mind.
"A soldier or a sailor, no matter who," she said;
"I pray, young men, come marry me, and don't let me die a maid."

Time to be Made a Wife - Canadian Folk Song Free Midi Download
Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

The Maid From Tidehead - Canadian Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

The Maid From Tidehead
Canadian Folk Song
Lyrics

In the dark tangled forest where the lumberjacks sing,
From their saws and their axes, the music it springs,
As I ceased from my labour at the close of the day,
I heard with regret a young lumberjack say:

"Oh, the nights they are weary and the days they are long,
Though my comrades they cheer me with music and song,
I'm tired and I'm lonesome and cold is my bed,
And I long once again for the Maid from Tidehead."

So give me my knapsack and homeward I'll go.
I'll heed not the wintry wind's howl or the snow,
For all I'll be thinking is the last words she said,
"Come back to your darling!" cried the Maid from Tidehead.

He'll kiss her, caress her, as he used to of yore
When they strolled side by side down the Restigouche shore,
And on her fair bosom he'll pillow his head;
No more will he roam from the Maid of Tidehead.

The Maid From Tidehead - Canadian Folk Song Free Midi Download
Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

Thyme, 'tis a Pretty Flower - Canadian Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

Thyme, 'tis a Pretty Flower
Canadian Folk Song
Lyrics

Intro
Thyme, 'tis a pretty flower
That grows out under the sun
And it's time you and I have come to an end
For it's now our time runs on.

   Refrain
   Thyme, 'tis a pretty flower
   That grows out under the sun
   And it's time you and I have come to an end
   For it's now our time runs on.

It's very well drinking ale, but
It's still better drinking wine
And it's far better sitting on a bonny boy's knee
That gains this heart of mine.

Oh, she walks in the garden
This lady oh so fine
And she weeds her garden green
'Lets no one steal her thyme.

It's very well drinking ale, but
It's still better drinking wine
And it's far better sitting on a bonny boy's knee
That gains this heart of mine.

Thyme, 'tis a Pretty Flower - Canadian Folk Song Free Midi Download
Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

She's Like The Swallow - Canadian Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

She's Like The Swallow
Canadian Folk Song
Lyrics

She's like the swallow that flies so high
She's like the river that never runs dry
She's like the sunshine on the lee shore
I love my love and love is no more.

Twas out in the garden this fair maid did go
A-picking the beautiful prim-rose
The more she plucked, the more she pulled
Until she got her apron full.

It's out of those roses she made a bed
A stony pillow for her head
She laid her down, no word she spoke
Until this fair maid's heart was broke.

She's like the swallow that flies so high
She's like the river that never runs dry
She's like the sunshine on the lee shore
I love my love and love is no more.

She's Like The Swallow - Canadian Folk Song Free Midi Download
Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor

Wednesday, June 15, 2011

The Stormy Scenes of Winter - Canadian Traditional/Folk Song Midi and Lyrics

The Stormy Scenes of Winter
Canadian Traditional/Folk Song
Lyrics

The stormy scenes of winter incline to frost and snow
And dark shades over the centres where the stormy winds do blow
You are the girl I've chosen for to be my only dear
Your scornful heart is frozen or else locked up, I fear.

One night I went to see my love; she proved most scornfully
I asked her for to marry, but she would not heed to me
The night is almost spent, my love, it's near the break of day
So now I want an answer; my dear, what do you say?

If I must tell you plainly, I'll lead a single life
I never thought it suitable for me to be your wife
So take this for an answer and for yourself provide
For I've another more suitable, and you I'll lay aside.

Oh, you have stores of riches, and more you hope to gain
And you have my fond wishes, but these you do disdain
Your riches will not last you, they'll melt away like snow
When poverty does cross you, you'll think of me, I know.

I'll steer my course for Flanders, I'll lead a single life
And with my bold commander, my gun shall be my wife
And when I do get money, to a tavern I will go
And drink a health to Flora, although she answered no.

The small birds they are singing so sweetly and so fine
My joys they would be springing if Flora was but mine
But still this life is pleasant, and love must have its fill
This world is wide and handsome, if you don't, some other will.

The Stormy Scenes of Winter - Canadian Traditional/Folk Song Free Midi Download
Midi files sequenced by Barry Taylor